Riverfront Playhouse Presents ‘Talking With’

Would you like a chance to study speech patterns in a controlled language lab?

Then come out to the Riverfront Playhouse on October 18, 19, or 20 for Talking With, by Jane Martin.

Talking With

From the website for the performance:

The play is composed of eleven ten-minute monologues, each featuring a different woman who talks about her life.

Tickets may be purchased in advance at http://www.artstheatre.org/ .

 

 

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Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Need a last minute Valentine’s Day gift?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  We’ve got just a handful of tickets left, so don’t miss out on the fun!

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Looking for something fun to do in the new year?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  Better yet, buy your tickets at the January 10th Writers Forum meeting.  Tickets purchased at the Writers Forum meeting are only 2 for $30-what a steal!

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Need a last minute Christmas gift?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  You can also leave a comment with your contact information and we’ll be sure to get your tickets to you in time for Christmas.

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

 

Leading Ladies at Riverfront Playhouse

Writers Forum is hosting our annual buyout night at Riverfront Playhouse.  The featured play is Ken Ludwig’s Leading Ladies, directed by our very own Jennifer Levens.  The play is February 7th at 7:30pm-just in time to take your sweetheart out for Valentine’s Day or to treat your own heart to some hilarious theater!  Tickets are $15.00 each.

Last April we had an absolute blast at Lend Me A Tenor, also written by Ken Ludwig and directed by Jennifer Levens.  I can’t remember ever laughing so hard at a play!  I’m laughing right now just thinking about it.  While I take a moment to compose myself, here’s a little more about the Leading Ladies:

“Leading Ladies is a comedy about two English Shakespearean actors, Jack and Leo, who find themselves so down on their luck that they are performing “Scenes from Shakespeare” on the Moose Lodge circuit in the Amish country of Pennsylvania. When they hear that an old lady in York, PA is about to die and leave her fortune to her two long-lost English nephews, they resolve to pass themselves off as her beloved relatives and get the cash. The trouble is, when they get to York, they find out that the relatives aren’t nephews, but nieces! Romantic entanglements abound, especially when Leo falls head-over-petticoat in love with the old lady’s vivacious niece, Meg, who’s engaged to the local minister. Meg knows that there’s a wide world out there, but it’s not until she meets “Maxine and Stephanie” that she finally gets a taste of it.” ~kenludwig.com

Then gather your friends for a great night of local theater.  Here’s what reviewers said about author Ken Ludwig’s Broadway production of Leading Ladies:

“Ludwig’s newest comedy is so funny, it will make sophisticated and reasonable men and women of the 21st century cackle till their faces hurt.”
The Houston Press

“Leading Ladies is consistently funny – indeed, increasingly hilarious as it progresses.”
The Houston Chronicle

“Leading Ladies is a highly combustible and continuously hilarious new comedy by Ken Ludwig, Broadway’s reigning comic writer.”
The Cleveland Plain Dealer

In case you’re still not convinced to join us, here’s a short clip from the actors at the Greenville Little Theater:

All ticket sale proceeds go to the Writers Forum Scholarship fund.  We hope to award at least one $500 scholarship to a local senior who excels in writing and is continuing their education at a college or university.  It’s only because of ticket sales that we’re able to make this scholarship possible.  So thank you for supporting young writers and local theater.

Tickets can be purchased at our January Writers Forum meeting.  If you’re unable to attend the January meeting and would like to purchase tickets, please leave a comment here or contact the Writers Forum at (530) 515-4828.  Checks can be made out to Writers Forum and mailed to:

Writers Forum

P.O. Box 492282

Redding, CA 96049-2282

See you at the theater!

A Message from the President: May, 2012

I hear that Kate Bourland and Alicia McCauley really sparked some interest in Blogging and our new revamped Website. “I hear,” because I was unable to attend their presentations at the April General Meeting due to a conflict in my “should not be so full” schedule. Days and weeks before the service assembly, I was fearful of being “stuck in Lodi again.”

Well, fear not. Lodi is a nice place to be stuck in. Lodi is best known as the Zinfandel Capital of the World, though its first national recognition came via the Creedence Clearwater Revival song “Lodi” whose key title lyrics are oft-repeated. Settled in the late 1800s, Lodi today is a thriving community of over 60,000 with numerous parks.

But before the Lodi experience, I was pleasantly pleased with the stormy night turnout for our buyout of Riverfront Playhouse for Lend Me a Tenor. Directed by our own Jennifer Levens, the cast was extremely tight with their lines, raucously funny, and a delight to watch. And of course, being writers, we did get the punch lines quicker than other audiences would have (or so I was told after the show by cast members).

On deck for May is a special program put together by our Program Chair Sharon Owen; special in that she is involved with the local chapter of Sisters in Crime that promotes the professional development and advancement of women writing crime fiction with over 3000 members in forty-eight chapters world-wide.

Lastly, a reminder that June is our twice-a-year gig that members get to read their work; whether from the dusty archives of your basement, a work-in-progress to get feedback, or special “just for that occasion” poem or prose, you have 5 minutes from your first breath. So get hopping.

Larry Watters,

Writers Forum President

Lend Me A Tenor

Writers Forum is hosting our annual buyout night at Riverfront Playhouse.  The featured play is five-time Tony winner Lend Me A Tenor, directed by our very own Jennifer Levens.  The play is April 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20.00 each.

All proceeds go to the Writers Forum Scholarship fund.  We hope to award at least one $500 scholarship to a local senior who excels in writing and is continuing their education at a college or university.  It’s only because of ticket sales that we’re able to make this scholarship possible.  So thank you for supporting young writers and local theater.

To purchase tickets, please leave a comment here or contact the Writers Forum at (530) 515-4828.  Checks can be made out to Writers Forum and mailed to:

Writers Forum

P.O. Box 492282

Redding, CA 96049-2282

Then gather your friends for a great night of local theater.  Here’s what reviewers said about author Ken Ludwig’s Broadway revival of Lend Me A Tenor:

A remarkable piece of theatre … a masterpiece … Author Ken Ludwig has verve, a sound grasp of plot mechanics and a rare ability to couple high art with low comedy.”
The London Times

A rollercoaster of fun for everybody in the building…a solid, constantly accelerating snowball of a comedy!
Phoenix News Times

And just to whet your appetite a bit more, here are some highlights from Lend Me A Tenor: