NOTICE TO ALL WRITERS FORUM MEMBERS

We have been advised by All Saints Episcopal Church that due to the coronavirus outbreak, our regular meeting room, Eaton Hall East, will not be available for gatherings until further notice.

To cooperate with current guidelines regarding the spread of this infection, the board of Writers Forum has decided to suspend our regular monthly meetings until this pandemic is no longer a threat to the health of the public. At this time, we do not plan to hold general meetings during the months of April through August of 2020.

It is our hope that we can reschedule our special event with Dr. Judy Melinek and T.J. Mitchell for September 12, 2020. We will continue to update our members with emails and notices on our website as more information becomes available.

Your Queen will be writing you encouraging letters and providing some nourishing homework assignments to aid you. If you are sipping some Inspirational Beer, or Quarantinis, you may have to read this again.

Please stay safe and take comfort in your writing.

The Board of Directors of Writers Forum

Authors Fair is Back!

2015 Authors Fair

After a three-year hiatus, the Authors Book Fair is back in a new location.

When Mt. Shasta Mall changed ownership, and the new owners took the center court in a direction that could not accommodate our function, we did not know of any other affordable venues that would fit the needs of the Authors Book Fair. The Writers Forum Board believes we have finally found that appropriate venue.

The 2019 Authors Book Fair will be on November 9 at the Holiday Inn Convention Center on Hilltop Drive. As before, the Authors Book Fair will be held in place of the regular meeting for November.

The name of the event has been slightly modified from the original Authors Fair. This is to clarify to the public that the Fair is not an event just for authors.

And we have a sponsor this year! K-SHASTA is helping us advertise and market the event.

KSHA1 LOGO

Wanted: Authors With Books Ready to Sell

The Fair is a free-to-the-public event held at the Holiday Inn Redding, Calif. Local authors can register for full or half tables, either all day or am/pm shifts. There will be a limited number of tables and pop-ups, so register early to be ensured a seat (some juggling may be necessary; you will be reimbursed for any differences). You may have posters on your table (or your portion of table). Chairs are provided; one per author, but you may bring your own for assistants or your comfort.

Open to authors that have books for sale, we invite all genres from mystery and children’s literature to historical and how-to-book writers. Graphic novelists are also invited. Fees range from $10 to $40, depending on whether you are a member or non-member.

Click here to open a registration application that you can complete on-line and submit. Payment must be received by October 29 to reserve your spot.

You Need a Valid Sellers Permit to Reserve Your Spot

In order to sell your books at a table with the Authors Book Fair, you will need you own seller’s permit through the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration.

Here’s a URL for the CDTFA site’s page about permits: http://www.cdtfa.ca.gov/services/permits-licenses.htm

Here’s their phone number:  (530) 224-4729

Here are the main points all sellers will want to be aware of:

How do I register for a permit, license, or account?

The CDTFA has a secure, convenient, fast, and free way to register online for a permit, license, or account. The system guides you through the process and will assist you with the types of permits you may need for your business.

We are looking forward to your participation. The last year we held the fair we had over 30 authors. We are limited to the tables that the Holiday Inn provides.

From the last Authors Fair…

A Different Sort of Member Monday

Our Member Monday spot usually features an original piece by a Writers Forum member. This week, we highlight a member who could use our help.

A novel from the Aimee Machado Mystery series by WF Program Director Sharon Owen (writing as Sharon St. George) has been nominated for an award. We can help her win that award.

Spine Damage, book four in the series, has been nominated for the 2018 “Reward of Novel Excellence” known as the RONE Award! You can see the nomination at this link: http://indtale.com/2018-rone-awards-week-six

Sharon’s book received a 4.5 star or higher review in InD’tale Magazine. This qualifies it to continue to the reader voting phase of the 2018 RONE Awards.  In this round the readers will be narrowing down the nominees for each genre by choosing the books they love best.

The voting for Sharon’s genre will be May 21st – 27th

Here are the voting instructions from InD’tale Magazine:

It is extremely important that all of Sharon’s readers and fans know about the voting dates!  We would hate to think a superior quality book lost only because people were unaware of the time limit. Also, voters MUST be registered on our website at www.indtale.com in order to vote. Once they register, if they haven’t already, they will be required to click the verification link sent to them via email. If they do not verify their registration with this link, they will be unable to vote. This is very important to help ensure that the voting is fair and maintains the high quality standards required for this top-tier award.

Once the voting is final and the four finalists’ books in Sharon’s genre are announced, those four books will then be read and judged by a group of professionals in the industry to determine the very best mystery novel in the indie and small published world!  The winner will then be announced and awarded the prestigious RONE Award at the formal ceremony, October 6th, 2018 in Burbank, California at the InD’Scribe Conference. http://www.indscribe.com

We at InD’tale Magazine have put in an incredible amount of time and effort to create and present the most credible and prestigious award in the industry today.  Our three-round system of elimination covers every facet – highly rated and reviewed, loved by fans, and critiqued by qualified judges.  No other award system today compares, making the RONE award the very highest of honors bestowed on a novel in the publishing industry.

Don’t forget, the voting window in Sharon’s genre is May 21st – 27th. Email writersforumprogramchair@gmail.com if you have questions.

Good luck, Sharon!

Member Monday: Jackie Cundiff

This week’s Member Monday is from Jackie Cundiff. Jackie shared this story at last December’s Read Around.

Our next Read Around is coming up in June. We invite everybody to come out and share a five minute reading of their work. We will post more details next month.

Rotisseries: Ferris Wheels for Chickens

I’m not big on doing barbeque or any cooking outdoors. I’ll be frank. I’m not too big on any cooking, but it’s one of life’s fundamental requirements. If necessary I can put on a good meal, maybe even an elegant meal. I raised four kids, and they fondly think of me as a good cook, but then their memory of their childhood differs from mine. Since my discovery of the George Foreman grill, my barbeque has stood unused, unless one of my macho boys shows up and brings meat. Then they cook it, which is almost as good as take out.

Some years ago, when I was still feeding three boys that consumed mountains of food daily, we purchased a new barbeque. It was pretty fancy. It had a bit of chrome, a temperature regulator, and a fancy rotisserie. As I peeked through the owner’s manual, I came across a picture of a beautiful turkey, done to perfection, using the rotisserie. I read through the directions, and as it looked pretty simple I decided that is what we would have for Thanksgiving when turkey is required cuisine.

The recipe called for a bird of twelve pounds or under. That was okay, as I never liked leftovers, and since there were only going to be seven of us, it seemed adequate. However, just to be sure, I purchased a boned twelve-pounder. On Turkey Day I propped the included booklet next to the grill, just in case I needed more directions, fed the turkey roast through the spit, and carefully inserted the prongs. I sure didn’t want it to fall off the spit. I set the temperature to medium, plugged her in, and we were cookin’.

It had clouded up a bit and a few flakes of snow drifted down. I moved a table close to the grill and raised the umbrella. After all, it was November and snow wasn’t unusual, but I didn’t know what a sudden snow flurry would do to our new grill or to our dinner.

I watched the roast rotate for a bit, and I thought it looked a little dry. I could fix that. I went to the kitchen for a cube of butter. I peeled the wrapper back and inch or so and returned to the porch to rub the butter on the bird. When I touched the butter to the outside of the turkey, it was hot-hot-hot. I dropped the butter, and it fell into the burner. It flared up, and the net bag that enclosed the meat caught fire. I grabbed the spit handle and pulled the turkey away from the fire thinking that it would go out. It just flared bigger. I waved it, trying to extinguish the flame, hit the umbrella and had another fire going. I screamed and called for help.

The men in the house were gathered around the TV with some football game or other, and my voice wasn’t heard over the crowd’s fervor. However, my daughter heard. She came running with the fire extinguisher. She sprayed the turkey. She sprayed the barbeque. She sprayed the umbrella. She sprayed the deck. She sprayed the air around us. She sprayed me. We were having a white Thanksgiving.

We weren’t having a turkey dinner, though. The new grill didn’t recover. The umbrella was a goner. Amid the general household hilarity, I headed for the shower. Soap and shampoo helped me recoup. But what about dinner? While I showered, my sons fried up some bacon and boiled some eggs. My daughter sliced some fruit, cooked up some white sauce, and toasted some English muffins. Soon we sat down to the traditional family emergency dinner, the dinner that effortlessly materialized when I stayed too long at the bridge table or was generally delayed getting home: creamed eggs on English muffins, bacon, and sliced fruit. The conversation was mostly about fire control, evacuation routes, and of course, my past faux pas, of which I have had a few.

I don’t do Thanksgiving from scratch anymore. I try to hint that someone else do it. One year I even faked a broken oven. Raley’s does a good turkey dinner if the hint doesn’t take, and you can keep it a couple of days before reheating and serving. The things we learn when we get old.