Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Need a last minute Valentine’s Day gift?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  We’ve got just a handful of tickets left, so don’t miss out on the fun!

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Looking for something fun to do in the new year?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  Better yet, buy your tickets at the January 10th Writers Forum meeting.  Tickets purchased at the Writers Forum meeting are only 2 for $30-what a steal!

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

Harvey by Mary Chase at Riverfront Playhouse

Need a last minute Christmas gift?  We’ve got the perfect idea.  Writers Forum is selling tickets to the play “Harvey” by Mary Chase.  The play will be performed at Riverfront Playhouse on Wednesday, February 11th at 7:30pm.  Tickets are $20 each and all proceeds benefit the Writers Forum Scholarship Fund.  To purchase tickets, please email writersforumpresident@gmail.com or writersforumtreasurer@gmail.com.  You can also leave a comment with your contact information and we’ll be sure to get your tickets to you in time for Christmas.

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the storyline of “Harvey”:

Elwood P. Dowd is an affable man who claims to have an unseen (and presumably imaginary) friend Harvey — whom Elwood describes as a six-foot, three-and-one-half-inch tall pooka resembling an anthropomorphic rabbit. Elwood introduces Harvey to everyone he meets. His social-climbing sister, Veta, increasingly finds his eccentric behavior embarrassing. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her and her daughter Myrtle Mae from future embarrassment. When they arrive at the sanitarium, a comedy of errors ensues. The young, handsome, and very flirtatious Dr. Sanderson commits Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When Elwood shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey, it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood’s delusion has had a strange influence on the staff, including sanitarium director Dr. Chumley. Only just before Elwood is to be given an injection that will make him into a “perfectly normal human being, and you know what bastards they are!” (in the words of a taxi cab driver who has become involved in the proceedings) does Veta realize that she’d rather have Elwood the same as he’s always been — carefree and kind — even if it means living with Harvey.

Still not convinced?  Here’s Jim Parsons in “Harvey”:

 

A Message from the President: November, 2014

I have been so busy prepping for our 10th Annual Northern California Authors Fair that those other things, like the monthly President’s Message for the Writers Forum, have taken a back seat to remembering that this November is a quick month for deadlines (there is not much time from the first of the month to the second Saturday). Adding a goodly portion of being a Poll Inspector when I have not worked the polls EVER and the preliminary training in ALL areas so I at least have some idea of what is going on when I inspect translates to a seating-on-the-edge anticipation that has to be dealt with one day at a time. This means one day I devote to Fair preparation and not think of Polling, and another day the opposite. Never would I entertain both thoughts. Or so my mind decides. But I have slips, trying to Multi-task.

But I am a guy, so the results are not pretty.

Anyhoo, the Fair replaces our General Meeting Saturday, November 8. Held Center Court at the Mt. Shasta Mall from 10 to 4, this year is a little above average with 34 authors sharing their writing experiences, networking, and of course, selling and signing their books ranging from Mystery to Children’s, History to Poetry  (even an illustrated book of poems about wine).

You are encouraged to drop by, chat, schmooze, do an impromptu volunteer gig, and most important, have a good time.

There are two silent auctions that fund our Scholarship; A Basket o’ Books donated by participating authors and an ex-stage prop Antique Typewriter donated by Riverfront Theater.

typewriter

Similar to Auctioned Typewriter

Hope to see ya there!

Writers Forum Scholarship Winner: Anthony Carrasco

Happy Saturday!  Perhaps you, too, were one of those kids who faithfully traipsed into the living room in your pajamas every Saturday morning to watch your comic book superheroes come to life in the form of Saturday morning cartoons.  Today we feature 2014 high school graduate Anthony Carrasco’s winning essay looking at superheroes through the lens of mythology.  Congratulations, Anthony!

Avenging Mythology

by Anthony Carrasco

The silver screen is red with blood. The human soul is splattered on the cinematic canvas; desires, feelings, and ideas are placed vulnerably in front of the viewer, with hands open for judgment. Within our society, one of the most craved film genres are superhero films. Why do the multitudes, from many age ranges, flock to the midnight premiers of these blockbuster behemoths? Perhaps it is more than just the cool special effects that hook us; perhaps the line that has us snagged is an eternal craving for mythology.

My hankering for a better understanding of why heroes are so popular occurred when I caught some scenes from The Incredible Hulk, 2008. The main antagonist in the film was named Abomination, which struck my interest. The word abomination is very connotative and fit the character’s outer and inner qualities. Perhaps this title was not given to him solely on account of his grotesque nature but also on account of being symbolic of a greater force. In comic books, ambiguous and provocative names are often given to super heroes and super villains alike. Heavily loaded names, such as Doctor Doom, The Dark Knight, Iron Man, Nightcrawler, and Darkside, feed the case that these heroes are themselves symbolic of larger ideas, institutions, and myths.

Mythology might be the deep attractive force that pulls so many in to Marvel megahits. When watching The Incredible Hulk, I couldn’t help but draw connections between Bruce Banner and Hercules. Still, there are many differences between comic book heroes and the heroes of ancient myths. One of the richest is the origin of their powers. The Greek heroes, such as Hercules gained their powers from the gods, but our modem-day heroes gain their powers from science.

Perhaps this in itself says something. In the past divinity bestowed power, but now in a society that has replaced god with science, technology bestows power. A radioactive spider bite makes Spider-Man, the Iron Man suit technology creates Iron Man, gamma rays produce the Hulk, and the super solider serum gives rise to Captain America. Thor, previously the Norse god of thunder, is now portrayed as a dimensional traveler. The only outlier is Superman; however, the whole concept of coming from space feeds the space-technology genre.

Superheroes have a lot of similarities to Greek myths. Iron Man, a flying metallic force that hurls bolt-like beams, resembles Zeus; Aqua Man has a semblance to Poseidon; the human torch and Hawkeye have many similarities to Apollo. Just like the Greeks admired the heroes and wanted to emulate their character traits, we admire our heroes and wish to emulate their character traits. In Hindu religion the heroes were the gods in human form and the paragons of ideal citizens. Today we wish to share in the superheroes’ traits of honor, bravery, and altruism. Perhaps superheroes are symbolic of ideal citizens and the manifestation of the classic good versus evil dichotomy within the world and our own hearts.

What if our superhero film fascination is an eternal craving for the mythic-hero epic modernized? Perhaps the big craze says more about our time and culture than we think. Perhaps we are approaching an age of science that will change what is to be human and transcend to superhuman. As the actor Tom Hiddleston, the actor who played Loki in The Avengers, said, “In our increasingly secular society, with so many disparate gods and different faiths, superhero films present a unique canvas upon which our shared hopes, dreams, and apocalyptic nightmares can be projected and played out.”

 

Success Story Saturday: Laura Hernandez

Welcome back to Success Story Saturday.  As often as possible, we’re featuring Writers Forum members who have been published, won writing contests, or have otherwise found recent success as writers.  Writers Forum members, we want to celebrate with you so please send your success stories to writersforumwebmaster@gmail.com.  

Today we’re celebrating with Writers Forum board member Laura Hernandez.  Congratulations, Laura!

New Mystery Writer Wins the 2013 Helen McCloy/MWA Scholarship

New York, NY – May 9, 2013 – Mystery Writers of America announces the recipients of the 2013 Helen McCloy/MWA Scholarship for Mystery Writing: Laura Hernandez of Redding, CA, and Lee Summerall of St. Petersburg, FL. Each will use her $500 scholarship award to offset tuition for advanced classes to further develop her writing skills.

The talent demonstrated by Ms. Hernandez received one of the highest scores from this year’s panel of judges.  Laura Hernandez worked on a team to defend accused murderers during law school and has written several stories based on her experiences. In her stories, the people in jail accused of murder are not always who you would expect them to be. She found the key to their defense, and the real mystery of each murder trial, was not about who had committed the crime, but why it had been done at all.

The purpose of this annual scholarship competition is to nurture talent in mystery writing. Each candidate qualifies by submitting a mystery-writing sample in the form of the first three chapters of a novel or nonfiction, or three short stories or a script. Candidates also provide details about the educational programs they will attend, 2 letters of recommendation, and an essay explaining their interest in mystery writing. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. No fee is required; neither is membership in Mystery Writers of America.

Applicants are judged by a committee of MWA members, each a published author in the field of crime. This year’s judges are: Julie Hyzy, New York Times bestselling author of 6 White House Chef Mysteries and 3 Manor House Mysteries, most recently Fonduing Fathers and Grace Among Thieves; Randy Rawls, author of 8 mysteries in 3 series, with Hot Rocks as his latest from Midnight Ink featuring South Florida P.I. Beth Bowman; Aileen G. Baron, archaeologist and author of The Gold of Thrace, an international hunt for antiquities thieves, and The Scorpion’s Bite, 3rd in the Lily Sampson archaeological mystery series; and editor Chris Roerden, author of the Agatha Award-winning Don’t Murder Your Mystery and its all-genre edition, Don’t Sabotage Your Submission. The scholarship program chair is Meredith Cole, award-winning author of Posed for Murder and Dead in the Water, and writing instructor at the University of Virginia.

Details and official application form for the 2014 scholarships are posted by July 4, 2013, on the website of Mystery Writers of America, http://mysterywriters.org. For frequently asked questions and tips for applying, email McCloy.MWA@gmail.com. Entries must be postmarked by February 28, 2014.

Writers Forum Scholarship Winner: Kayla Mitchel

We’re taking a break from the typical Member Monday to introduce you to Kayla Mitchel, our 2013 Writers Forum scholarship winner.  Here’s Kayla on school and her writing life.  Congratulations, Kayla! 

Kayla Mitchell-web“I am currently taking chemistry, calculus, philosophy, roots of contemporary issues, and a physics seminar. My favorite by far is philosophy; I love thinking and questioning, and that is exactly what that class is for. I am also excited for my physics seminar. Even though it is only once a week, we get to hear from many of the professors about their research. Every week it reminds me why I am so excited to go into astrophysics. There are actually a surprising number of astrophysics students at this school, so for once I am not the only one. The campus is beautiful, and while it may be one big hill, it sure has a great view from the top. The people here are very kind and open, as it is a fairly small town. All in all, I am glad I chose to come to Washington State University.
As far as my writing, the new environment has given me a lot of inspiration. Being outside has always made me content and thoughtful, and being here gives me more opportunities to simply go outside, sit under a tree in the shade, and write. I still attempt some poems, as I would love to improve on them, but mostly, as always, I write whatever is in my heart. With so many new faces, writing is familiar, and I can write anything I cannot yet say to the people I have met. I am hopeful that  I will form some long-lasting friendships here, perhaps some among the many aspiring astrophysicists I mentioned. But most of all, I am hopeful for the future in general. I believe I will learn a lot from not only my professors and classes but also from my friends, my surroundings, and maybe even myself. I know I want to be an astrophysicist, study the stars and how the universe works, and I really believe that this school is my next step. Who knows? I may even find myself among the stars. At this point, it feels like I can make my life whatever I want it to be.”

A Note from the Webmaster: If you’re a Writers Forum member in good standing and would like to be featured on Member Monday, please send your submission to writersforumwebmaster@gmail.com. Submissions should be 75-750 words, appropriate for all ages and error free. Please include a short bio, a headshot and any related links. The author retains all rights and gives permission to Writers Forum to publish their submission on the website and/or in the newsletter. Thank you!